Pepperdine is nice but this is a straight disrespect to Space Jam

Pepperdine

I’d like to start by saying Pepperdine journalism was amazing for me. It gave me a foundation, lifelong friends and taught me valuable lessons. Pepperdine’s International Programs are also legendary. London IP was by far the highlight of my college experience.

HOWEVER, this is not OK.

Pepperdine’s New Student Orientation this year was space themed, so for decorations they used “Space Jam” on signs. Initially I was really excited — wow! SPACE JAM THIS IS AWESOME I LOVE YOU ALMA MATER. But no. In this context, “Space Jam” is a space-themed dance. Far from this:

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TRAVESTY. SCANDAL. We must not let Michael Jordan’s Space Jam die. I grew up running around the house singing, “I Believe I Can Fly.” It doesn’t matter that I haven’t seen the movie in 10-plus years.

If you’re thinking, “Well, maybe those girls simply weren’t dressed for the occasion,” I confirmed with other students that this is indeed space-themed with no correlation to the film. Others are in space tights and one of my friends texted me: “All those in space suits are worthy of expulsion FROM THE PLANET.” Yes, apparently there are people running around in space. suits.

The logos are far too similar for this mistake to have been made. Someone knew

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What’s done is done. I just wanted to vent and get this out there — to make people aware of what is happening. Even if the 1996 cartoon sports flick wasn’t the greatest movie of all time, it was a great movie at the time for a little kid. Don’t let it die. Please.

I’ll leave you with more Pepperdine social media things. Maybe this adds context. Maybe it’s not their fault (?):

(as seen on Instagram)

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Santa Monica is the GOAT

Life

Alysha Tsuji

I wrote the following for the student-produced 2015 Pepperdine Housing Guide. Traditionally, the articles within it haven’t made their way online, so I thought I’d share it here.

I’m going to start with the obvious: Malibu is not a college town. Malibu is the antithesis of a college town. It is isolated, it is quiet, it despises chain store establishments.

Pepperdine, as you all know, is in Malibu. I chose to live on campus for the majority of my time as a student. I spent my freshman year in Hayes House, my sophomore year abroad in the London house, my junior year in Lovernich and part of my senior year in Drescher.

I moved off campus to Santa Monica in the middle of senior year. I thought it would be horrible. The idea seemed scary at first. However, what I learned is that change happens, change is inevitable and change is awesome.

Santa Monica changed my life.

Leaving campus was like a breath of fresh air — the cleanest, freshest air. Malibu had slowly started to suffocate me. Sure, there were perks to living on campus. It’s cool to see Gerard Butler at the Starbucks down the street and to be a 10-minute walk away from classes. But moving brought me a pleasantly surprising sense of peace.

The people of Santa Monica are quirky in a charming way (especially the people at the Starbucks on Wilshire), everything is in walking distance and, if you split apartment costs, the rent is affordable (when put in direct comparison with Pepperdine housing charges). Plus, out here I can’t get expelled for having an unopened bottle of wine in my fridge.

Late Nights

The only asterisk to the overwhelmingly long list of pros is the drive. Although, it’s not as bad as it seems. I’ve yet to run into more than 20 to 30 minutes of light traffic. The one exception was Jan. 15 when men’s basketball played Gonzaga. I sat on PCH for 1.5 hours to make it to Firestone in time for tip-off, but that was an anomaly. After the game, ESPN reported that Gonzaga Coach Mark Few said about the traffic jam, “I’ve done this 26 times and I’ve never seen anything like that.”

PCH is amiable most of the time if you give it a chance.

Now you may be wondering who I’m living with, how I went about finding an apartment way out in the mysterious lands of Santa Monica in the middle of the year and whether or not I’ll have to keep my lease for 12 months.

My move happened to be unexpected, so I’m living solo in a studio (I didn’t have time to find roommates). Finding the studio simply required a strong sense of urgency and a little bit of Googling. As far as the lease, I managed to score a shortened 5-month lease for a 12-month price on a special holiday deal.

The act of suddenly shifting cities wasn’t particularly fun, though. The abrupt change of location was stressful (it involved me sleeping on an L-shaped couch for a month), but it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. If you’re contemplating living situation plans for the next school year, just know that Pepperdine housing, Villa Malibu, Malibu Villa, the Stinkies and other Malibu-localized accommodations aren’t your only options.

Soak in the college experience and create bonds with your classmates, yet don’t fear stepping out of your comfort zone and embracing freedom.

The Pepperdine perspective: College cooking

Pepperdine

For many undergraduate students, college is their first real whiff of independence. And if it is, successfully executing small tasks such as cooking and cleaning can feel impossible.

At Pepperdine University, freshmen are required to live on-campus and purchase a 1,500-point meal plan. It makes the transition easy because having 1,500 points means the majority of freshmen eat almost every meal in the school cafeteria.

However, after students go through the deer-in-the-headlights first year phase, sophomores, juniors and seniors are given more freedom in selecting meal plan sizes. The question of, “To cook or not to cook?” comes into play.

Throughout this feature, sophomore Conor Burke; juniors Alina Ching and Yi Quin; and seniors Chase Vanderpol, Brandon Scheirman and Patrick Rear share their experiences and opinions surrounding the topic of “College Cooking.”

[Full disclosure: I have worked closely with Scheirman and Rear as fellow staff members of the Pepperdine Graphic. Currently, I am the print managing editor, Rear is the Perspectives section editor and Scheirman is a photographer.]

Do you like to cook?

While cooking at home rather than buying Caf food may be cheaper, healthier and even more enjoyable, students’ busy lives can hinder the development of their inner-chef.

Vanderpol is often busy with pre-med studies, Qin takes an abundance of night classes, Ching competes on the NCAA Division I women’s golf team and Burke is a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. Rear participates as a member of the Graphic staff and the Pepperdine Debate team, and Scheirman is a photographer and serves on SGA.

While breaking out the pots and pans daily is unrealistic, the six of them said that at one point or another they have cooked meals while attending Pepperdine. That led straight into the next question.

What’s your go-to dish?

Each person brought up a variety of dishes from pizza to pancakes. Additionally, Scheirman and Rear explained that studying abroad in Germany sparked their passion for cooking.

“In Heidelberg we had a kitchen and we all often made giant feasts,” Rear said as Scheirman nodded in agreement.

Now, the two host a monthly brunch in their George Page apartment.

“There’s nothing more exciting and more fun than making a giant dinner or a giant breakfast with ten of your favorite friends,” Scheirman said.

Because Scheirman and Rear express such joy in routinely flexing their culinary skills, I then asked if they would give a mini tour of their apartment kitchen and provide tips to any college students struggling to grasp the cooking concept.

“Welcome to our apartment”: Kitchen tour and cooking tips

Something to note is that these guys didn’t become pro-chefs overnight. Both began cooking from a young age and it carried over to enhance their college experience.

Rear grew up living abroad in Austria as well as in Portland, Ore., and said he always had an interest in food.

“When I came to Pepperdine, I was dismayed I did not have a kitchen,” Rear said. “So it became a goal to get a kitchen.”

Likewise, Scheirman said he also expressed sadness upon the lack of a kitchen his freshman and junior years. He was a freshman RA his third year.

Scheirman’s love for cooking was brought about by the fact that his grandparents “had a couple of restaurants in the Portland, Ore., area.”

Even though Scheirman and Rear have extensive culinary experience stemming from childhood, they encourage everyone to join in on the fun — as Rear stated at the end of the above clip:

“Just do it. Don’t be afraid. It’s a great time to bring friends together and bond and have fun. And you get good food out of it in the end.”

Green grass and pigskin

Sports
Photo by Alysha Tsuji

Photo by Alysha Tsuji

Pepperdine University has no football, and I attend Pepperdine University. It’s an unfortunately short chain of facts.

Those tailgating Instagram photos that all my USC friends regularly post are like stabs to the gut. And how much press USC and UCLA receive for football alone is killer.

Meanwhile I’m over here, an aspiring sports journalist, in Malibu trying to make do with the smaller market Division I sports. I’m not saying they aren’t great — both men and women’s volleyball teams and our women’s golf team in particular are consistently stellar — I’m just saying that hype-wise our student body usually lacks the school spirit that the larger football schools possess.

But there is a silver lining. I attend Pepperdine University and over 40 percent of the student body are from out-of-state, which means that we have many students who have grown up closely following college football powerhouses — my roommate is one of them.

Almost every single weekend, without fail, she’ll be cheering on the Auburn Tigers from our apartment. According to Google Maps, Auburn, Ala., is 2,138.2 miles away from Los Angeles. Yet come Saturday, my roommate is rooting for the Tigers with more enthusiasm than I’ve ever seen from fans at the Staples Center.

With Auburn 10-1 this season, a sharp season-to-season improvement coinciding with the hiring of their new head coach, it has been fun hearing about the wins. And with her team facing off against rivals Alabama next Saturday, Nov. 30, she’s hyped.

I lend the excitement to the culture of collegiate football — it’s not just a game, it’s a lifestyle. I admire it. As a girl born and raised in Southern California, the closest I got to that fandom feeling was when USC had Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart. My uncle graduated from USC and my dad dropped out, so I was sort of connected by a very thin thread.

Recently I covered a local high school football game that was the first live football game I had attended in a long while. It was actually the first ever Friday night football game I have ever attended (my high school didn’t have football field lights — I’ve been deprived of the game my whole life, be sad for me). The excitement of the boys running on the field and the parents pacing the bleachers made me fall in love with sports all over again for the hundredth time.

No matter the score or the level, when the people in the stands are passionate and the players on the field are doing their best, there is nothing like it. It’s a beautiful thing.