The Lakers’ season opener didn’t go very well

Sports

The Lakers went through an agonizing, epic fail of a loss in their season opener vs. the Timberwolves. The worst part wasn’t that they lost — the worst part was how they lost.

Everything looked OK from the jump. HELL YEAH LAKERS ARE BACK KOBE IS BACK EVERYONE GET HYPED. Nick Young did this after the first quarter to put LA up, 31-22:

Kobe had 15 points, hitting 6 of 13 shots, at the half.

The Lakers were outscored by 2 points in the third quarter, but they still held the lead going into the fourth quarter. Then…

EVERYTHING COLLAPSED AND BURNED.

The Timberwolves chomped up a 16-point deficit to win by 1 POINT, 112-111. The Lakers’ high-scorer in the fourth quarter was Jordan Clarkson, who had five points. The entire LA roster notched either a 0 or below-0 plus/minus except for Julius Randle who tallied a 1.

Afterwards, coach Byron Scott told the media:

Oh wait, that sounds familiar…

(check the year on that Serena Winters tweet)

Sigh. Welp. All I can say is SWAGGY’S STILL SWAGGY.

My hate to love relationship with EDM

Music

“It gives me a headache.”

That was my first impression of EDM. It just sounded like uncorrelated banging bass beats. I didn’t get it. But it’s so popular — all the festivals, especially. I wanted to understand.

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In LA there are tons of concerts constantly going on, so my friend — a self-professed EDM junkie — dragged me to see Carnage last September. Before this, I had never heard of Carnage and I hated EDM. But the openers started mixing in Drake and Kanye, so I bobbed to the beats. When Carnage came on, the crowd went WILD, and I was swept up in the madness — as simple as that.

The experience of having everyone around me so invested in the sound engulfing us had me sold. After that concert, I wanted more. I was down with this.

Next up, we went to see the Chainsmokers. The only thing I knew about them prior to this was that they did the “Selfie Song” (I’ve never listened to that song all the way through, even to this day). That same friend, though, sent me this song:

DONE. IT IS OVER. I LOVE THIS. The concert was dope. Now I’m addicted.

Although, I feel like it’s only acceptable to be into EDM in your 20s and maybe early 30s (correct me if I’m wrong). I’ll enjoy it while it lasts. If anyone knows any cool EDM spots in NYC, let me know.

Also, read this awesome post by Rembert Browne: “EDM is Dead. EDM Will Live Forever; One Man’s Dance Floor Confession.”

Observations After 4 Weeks in NYC

Life

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I’m spending my longest stint ever in the Big Apple this summer as an intern for MLB.com — early June to early August. Born and raised as an Angeleno, naturally I’ve always wanted to live in New York. I’ve been fortunate enough to have that hope become a reality. If I have the opportunity to stay past this summer, I gladly will. These are three things I’ve noticed about this grand city so far:

1. The people aren’t as cold as everyone on the West Coast stereotypes them to be.
Sure the New York vibe is different than LA’s vibe. People are generally more dressed up when they go out, and their idea of walking is closer to running. And during one of my first weeks here I had a miscommunication with a nut vendor, and was told to “Fuck off.” But for the most part, everyone’s alright. I’ve had plenty of positive interactions with strangers. New Yorkers, you’re good with me.
2. Humidity will not kill you. 
Everyone told me of the horrors of the “East Coast humidity,” so I mentally prepared myself. Granted, it hasn’t been that hot since I’ve gotten here, but I honestly don’t think it’s that bad. Maybe it’s because I’ve spent countless insanely hot plus-100 degree summers with no AC in West Covina. Maybe I’ll be dying in a few weeks. What I’m trying to say here is don’t let weather woes deter you.
3. Cheap food exists.
Prices are high, as they are in any major city, but cheap eats are also a thing, as they are in any major city. There’s dollar pizza and $1.25 dumplings. I had a friend write this on one of my Facebook statuses:
“And the culture of drinks after work and sunday brunch is fun. If only they paid people 20K more so you don’t have to live in Brooklyn or Queens, and can actually afford to go out and do the artsy stuff, it’d be perfect..”
I say that’s a gross exaggeration, and it’s possible to make the city an affordable place if you really try hard enough. (I might just be saying this as a naive, not-yet-hired recent college grad)
I’m sure I’ll have more to add to this list as the weeks roll on, like whether or not Shake Shack trumps In-N-Out (I doubt it will). Cheers to new places and new spaces and new faces and living life on the edge.

LA SHINES BRIGHT

Life, Music, Sports

A lot of things in life are impossible:

1. Me dunking

2. Counting to infinity

3. Living forever

The list goes on and it can feel weighty — a little hope goes a long way.

Los Angeles is not lacking in hope. People flock to LA with high aspirations, as if the streets were paved with gold. I’m born and raised in this city, so to me the whole “I’m leaving home to make it in LA” story sounds more cliche than anything else. But it’s very real.

This year I’ve interviewed two young musicians — one from Florida and the other from China (article to publish in September) — who both spontaneously left their families to pursue dreams in the City of Angels. They both also said that upon arriving to LA, they felt a unique vibe in the air — a sense that anything is possible, that everyone wants to be something.

Recent NBA news has lived up to the LA hype, especially concerning the Asian American community.

First, hometown girl Natalie Nakase served as an assistant coach for the Clippers during the 2014 NBA Summer League in Las Vegas. She has been a video coordinator for the Clippers, and her ultimate goal is to be the first female head coach in the NBA.

Some might say it’s a lofty aspiration. She has chops to back it up with her playing time at UCLA, her coaching experience in Japan and her friends with league ties, detailed in Kate Fagan’s feature from 2012. Now Nakase’s one step closer.

Second, hometown boy Jeremy Lin is now a Los Angeles Laker. As of 2013, Asians make up 14.6% of Los Angeles County, so you can bet that despite Lin waving off any notions of Linsanity, it’ll pick right up again in no time.

And remember this?

Kobe Bryant and Lin are now teammates. Lin even revealed that Kobe sent him a text proclaiming that there is lots of work to be done. Dreams do come true!

Stories like that of Nakase and Lin provide a glimmer of hope for a city of dreams.

I grew up playing in the same asian leagues as Nakase and I remember constantly hearing her name like she was a kid prodigy. To see her rise through the ranks on pure dedication is a fitting reminder of another cliche: Hard work pays off.